Resina Formlabs Flexible

La Resina Elastic de Formlabs es perfecta para la producción de piezas blandas y elásticas.
  217,80 €
Envio gratis
Disponible
SKU
FORMLAB-RS-F2-FLGR
SKU
RS-F2-FLGR

Resina Flexible

La Resina Flexible simula un caucho de 80A. Use este material versátil para producir piezas que necesiten ser dobladas y comprimidas. La Resina Flexible es excelente para la simulación de materiales suaves al tacto y la adición de características ergonómicas a un conjunto de múltiples materiales.

  • Mangos, empuñaduras y sobremoldes
  • Cojinetes y amortiguaciones
  • Prototipos usables
  • Empaquetado
  • Estampas
Resina Flexible

La Resina Flexible es un material más blando, con un durómetro de 80A alrededor de los cauchos utilizados para las suelas de los zapatos o las bandas de rodadura de los neumáticos. Este material más elástico tiene un módulo de tensión bajo y de alargamiento alto.

Más Información
SKU (Número de referencia) FORMLAB-RS-F2-FLGR
Código Producto RS-F2-FLGR
es_estudiante No
Características
Más Información Introducing Elastic Resin: A Soft, Resilient 3D Printing Material

Formlabs is pleased to announce Elastic Resin, the latest addition to our library of Engineering Resins for the Form 2 desktop stereolithography (SLA) 3D printer.

Elastic Resin is the most pliable of our Engineering Resins, with a Shore durometer of 50A as well as high elongation and energy return. Parts printed in this material look and behave like a molded silicone part, and are durable enough to use for multiple cycles.

Elastomeric Materials: An Emerging Category

Typically, soft silicone and urethane parts for applications like wearables, medical models, robotics, and special effects props are produced through moldmaking techniques or outsourcing.

Some soft materials for direct 3D printing have started to appear, but parts printed in these materials might only last for one or two cycles, and don’t offer the feel expected from a “silicone-like” part. Developing soft stereolithography (SLA) resins can be challenging. Parts must be highly elastic, yet strong enough not to tear during printing—two properties that are typically diametrically opposed.

Faster Turnaround Time for Rapid Product Development

For companies like NeoSensory, a designer of wearables that create novel sensory experiences, and RightHand Robotics, a designer of robotic grippers for manufacturing lines, the ability to rapidly prototype silicone parts before manufacturing is key to successful development of final products with the potential to change an industry.

Engineers and product designers have traditionally used moldmaking techniques (such as RTV molding, transfer molding, and injection molding) to create short runs of prototype parts in silicone. Directly printing these parts saves time and labor, allowing for deeper iteration and shorter product development cycles.

Use Elastic Resin to produce batches of small to moderately sized soft flexible parts with the ability to make changes to design between and within batches. Moldmaking may be preferable for producing larger numbers of the same part, or for using the final production material during later stages of development.

Reducing Costs for Patient-Specific Anatomical Models

Surgeons, researchers, radiologists, and other healthcare professionals depend on patient-specific medical models to better prepare for complex cases and operations. Models facilitate better communication both within surgical teams and between practitioners and patients. We’ve heard many requests from healthcare professionals for a clear flexible material to support cases in cardiac surgery, neurosurgery, surgical oncology, and other specialties.

Historically, medical models from service providers and traditional industrial machines have been prohibitively expensive, with slow turnaround times. The ability to quickly and affordably 3D print educational and preoperative planning models on demand expands access across the industry, and we’re excited to see the future impact of Elastic Resin on doctors, researchers, and patients.

Design Guidelines for Elastic Resin

We’ve worked to develop and test a material that will print to the high quality standard you’ve come to expect from Formlabs materials. However, soft 3D printing materials in general require denser support structures and attention to specific design guidelines before you print.

Start Printing

As 3D printers and their subsystems evolve, so does access to new materials. With the launch of Elastic Resin, we’re excited to continue evolving our library of Engineering Resins and open up new possibilities in product design, healthcare, and beyond.

Introducing Elastic Resin: A Soft, Resilient 3D Printing Material

Formlabs is pleased to announce Elastic Resin, the latest addition to our library of Engineering Resins for the Form 2 desktop stereolithography (SLA) 3D printer.

Elastic Resin is the most pliable of our Engineering Resins, with a Shore durometer of 50A as well as high elongation and energy return. Parts printed in this material look and behave like a molded silicone part, and are durable enough to use for multiple cycles.

Elastomeric Materials: An Emerging Category

Typically, soft silicone and urethane parts for applications like wearables, medical models, robotics, and special effects props are produced through moldmaking techniques or outsourcing.

Some soft materials for direct 3D printing have started to appear, but parts printed in these materials might only last for one or two cycles, and don’t offer the feel expected from a “silicone-like” part. Developing soft stereolithography (SLA) resins can be challenging. Parts must be highly elastic, yet strong enough not to tear during printing—two properties that are typically diametrically opposed.

Faster Turnaround Time for Rapid Product Development

For companies like NeoSensory, a designer of wearables that create novel sensory experiences, and RightHand Robotics, a designer of robotic grippers for manufacturing lines, the ability to rapidly prototype silicone parts before manufacturing is key to successful development of final products with the potential to change an industry.

Engineers and product designers have traditionally used moldmaking techniques (such as RTV molding, transfer molding, and injection molding) to create short runs of prototype parts in silicone. Directly printing these parts saves time and labor, allowing for deeper iteration and shorter product development cycles.

Use Elastic Resin to produce batches of small to moderately sized soft flexible parts with the ability to make changes to design between and within batches. Moldmaking may be preferable for producing larger numbers of the same part, or for using the final production material during later stages of development.

Reducing Costs for Patient-Specific Anatomical Models

Surgeons, researchers, radiologists, and other healthcare professionals depend on patient-specific medical models to better prepare for complex cases and operations. Models facilitate better communication both within surgical teams and between practitioners and patients. We’ve heard many requests from healthcare professionals for a clear flexible material to support cases in cardiac surgery, neurosurgery, surgical oncology, and other specialties.

Historically, medical models from service providers and traditional industrial machines have been prohibitively expensive, with slow turnaround times. The ability to quickly and affordably 3D print educational and preoperative planning models on demand expands access across the industry, and we’re excited to see the future impact of Elastic Resin on doctors, researchers, and patients.

Design Guidelines for Elastic Resin

We’ve worked to develop and test a material that will print to the high quality standard you’ve come to expect from Formlabs materials. However, soft 3D printing materials in general require denser support structures and attention to specific design guidelines before you print.

Start Printing

As 3D printers and their subsystems evolve, so does access to new materials. With the launch of Elastic Resin, we’re excited to continue evolving our library of Engineering Resins and open up new possibilities in product design, healthcare, and beyond.

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